Kit Home Prices

Asking "what are kit home prices like compared to builder built homes?" sounds like a valid question, but in reality, they must be compared in true perspective. That is, apples with apples! Builders build from the ground up. They do everything from plans to setting out, from foundation to roofing. In reality, the cost to build a home from a kit is almost twice the cost of the kit itself. That is, the actual kit delivery comes after many processes have taken place. For example: buying land, drawing of plans, soil tests, surveying, house pad excavation and foundations. There's $20-30k without the cost of land.

If the kit is only costed to lockup, as most are, not included are the costs of the interior lining, doors, flooring, kitchen, bathroom, plumbing, drainage, electrical and painting. Not forgetting air con, landscaping, driveways, wardrobes, tiling and lights. There's another $50-$80k.

Kit house prices vary between providers, and according to the size, design and style of the house. Expect costs to increase if you opt for higher quality items over what the provider lists as inclusions or if you want to add extras or change the design. You get what you pay for.

There are a lot of terms used by kit home providers that can be confusing for the potential buyer such as, 'to lockup', 'full kit', 'all inclusions' and the ever popular 'basic kit'. These terms are explained in the next section.

Kit home prices: What does it all mean?

Let's start with the term 'to lockup', also called a 'basic kit'. This is a stage one kit and means a house kit that is supplied with enough materials to lock up the house and includes cladding, roofing and insulation, windows and exterior doors. It also includes interior framing of course and a complete set of submittable house plans and certifications. 'To lockup' does not include foundation materials. This is one way to compare kits as it is to an exact level of completion. The differences in prices will come when material specifications differ e.g. cladding, roofing, hardwood/softwood etc.


Then there is the 'full kit'. Now this is where the fun starts. A full kit from one provider can be very different from another. A full kit includes stage one and stage two, which is the interior wall and ceiling linings, interior doors and door furniture, mouldings and robes.

Now where it gets tricky is that stage three is sometimes included in the "full kit" but not always. Stage three includes foundation piers, flat-packed kitchen cabinets, kitchen faucets, bathroom basics-toilet, vanity, bath, shower-base and faucets.

Stage three adds considerably to the cost of kit houses if high end items are chosen. Most prices do not include delivery or foundations.

Tip: Compare a specific square footage, single level, wood framed kit cost to lockup from one supplier with another: apples with apples.

Some examples of kit home prices from supplier websites

Australian kit homes Go to Review

2br 1 bathroom weekender $47,000
3br double storey $70,000 (includes internal linings and doors)

Alternate Dwellings Go to Review

$49,000 to $87,000 (to lockup only)

Ezy Homes Australia Go to Review

Full kit
$60,000 to $120,000

Flatpack Kit Homes Go to Review

Full kit
1 br Cabin $33,429
5 br family home $100,000

Homefab Go to Review

To lock up
$59,000 to $90,000

Ozkit Homes Go to Review

To lockup
3br $52,000 to 5br $120,000

Post and Beam Go to Review

To lockup
3br Loft $106,000 4br Clerestorey $109,000

Statewide Homes Go to Review

To lock up

$79,000 to $131,000 (including internals)

First Day Cottage Go to Review

To Lockup
$28,000 for a 1000sqft cottage
$54,000 for a 1800sqft cottage

Pacific Modern Homes Go to Review

To Lockup
$40,000 to $100,000

Blue Mountain Yurts Go to Review

Complete Yurt on your foundation/deck
6 metre (20') diameter $17,000
7 metre (23') diameter $19,000
9 metre (29') diameter $23,600

Kit home prices shown are for kits supplied ex-factory. No land, foundations, not erected or inspected. They are mostly cost to lockup, so the cost to build a kit home will be at least 100% more plus land. House kits with prices on the net should be taken with a grain of salt and investigated to see the true nature of the offer, especially if you are an owner builder.

For example, a recent 'due diligence' exercise I did with a local kit home provider revealed the standard kit delivered to my site, (un-built) was $54,000AUD. After adding bushfire rated windows and screens, a small cladding upgrade, and a raised floor system, the price went up to $78,000AUD.

Now I wanted to build on an uncleared block so the price of the kit was secondary, compared with the cost of clearing and site cut, driveways, power and phone, septic system, council costs, survey, soil tests, fences, pumps, electricians, plumbers, setting piers, gyprocking, tiling and flooring etc, which amounted to around $120,000AUD. So like I explained in the last paragraph, add 100% to your kit price to get ball park completion figure.

Check out my General Kit Home Inclusions Page or

Go to Kit Home Basics Homepage