Minimalist House Design

Craving simplicity? Then minimalist house design, with its clean lines and emphasis on form and function, might be for you.

With its roots in an artistic movement of the 1950s, minimalism has blossomed to encompass everything from high fashion in clothing to interior design and architecture.

Some people think of minimalism as a counterpoint to the notion that ‘bigger is better’, which is great news for people who are looking for small homes, kit house designs or other simple house plans. But just because the design is minimalist doesn’t mean that it’s boring. These types of houses absolutely shine.

So, you might ask, what’s great about this type of design? The clever use of space and storage options for small homes is a notable feature, as is the emphasis on open plan rooms, neutral colour tones and ambiance that oozes relaxation and style. These modern homes can also be easier to maintain, keep clean, heat and cool.

So, you might ask, what’s great about this type of design? The clever use of space and storage options for small homes is a notable feature, as is the emphasis on open plan rooms, neutral colour tones and ambiance that oozes relaxation and style. These modern homes can also be easier to maintain, keep clean, heat and cool.

So, what are the drawbacks? Well, if you consider being organised and reasonably tidy major challenges, or if you love to collect or hoard, then a minimalist kit house design probably shouldn’t be your first choice.

Your treasures that could be stored and displayed in traditional homes with their discrete spaces and multiple rooms will look like clutter in these sleek style homes.

Five tips for minimalist house design:

  • Decide what you absolutely cannot live without and make sure your design can accommodate these things
  • Always consider innovative storage solutions to maximise your use of every square inch of space
  • Only build in as many rooms as you require – you might not really need that third bedroom for relatives after all
  • Consider housing the laundry in the bathroom and disguising it behind sliding doors to save space

How to start reducing

  1. Do you need a spare bedroom to use once a year when the parents visit?
  2. Do you need more storage space to store unwanted/unneeded items until they rot and must be thrown out?

Jay Shafer calls it 'subtractive design'. Removing unusable parts from an oversized house-plan is a beginning. So what ever does not contribute to the function, does not directly assist the occupant, or does not enhance quality of life, is systematically eliminated. Minimalist house design states that extra bathrooms, bedrooms and space require extra money, time and energy from the occupant.

A simple home is the most effective labor-saving device there is.

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